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leon10tagg

Post your TDI/PD dynos here

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Look at the shape of it. If it where mine I'd want that fixed or removed and a refund given.
Gavin, The car was set up on a dyna-pack not a rolling road. Please note that any 'rolling road' due to the inertia contained within the rollers will simulate a 'smoother' curve, whereas a dyna-pack due to its more 'direct' method of measurement will provide a 'different' style of curve. Just because the curve looks 'peaky' does not mean that the car will perform poorly.....the proof as always is how the car drives on the road.

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Glad to see you have a sense of humour Gav, however you have obviously missed or are ignoring the point of what I said i.e. Please note that any 'rolling road' due to the inertia contained within the rollers will simulate a 'smoother' curve, whereas a dyna-pack due to its more 'direct' method of measurement will provide a 'different' style of curve. Just because the curve looks 'peaky' does not mean that the car will perform poorly.....the proof as always is how the car drives on the road. What I have stated above is engineering fact that you can if you want disagree with but it is correct. Leonard

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It appears that I am wasting my time trying to be of help and explain the impact of mass and inertia associated with a rolling road and how the rollers damp out the peaks and troughs. A dyna-pack on the other hand, due to its quicker reaction time has the ability to capture 'more data' and will therefore always present a less appealing curve......for some. Regards your comments lol what a pile of MDS!!! Here's two other files form them with no mountain range graphs lol, all be it the figures are total pie in the sky... Look at the curves and the way that they are presented!!

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inertia dyno dont give correct figures ive been on few and graphs are all smooth and no load simulated, sure if you look at the first dyno figure leon posted , the standard torque figures look bumpy, you would except a good diesel to be like this. tuned figures are simliar,

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It appears that you know all things TDI but should I have expected anything else. Regards tdiclub I have asked a question....so what...its better than sitting on the fence.... As you appear to be an expert on all things TDI could you please inform me about the differences between a dynapack and a rolling road as you appear to know all about them.

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inertia dyno dont give correct figures ive been on few and graphs are all smooth and no load simulated' date=' sure if you look at the first dyno figure leon posted , the standard torque figures look bumpy, you would except a good diesel to be like this. tuned figures are simliar,[/quote'] Edition Thanks Leonard

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The first and most obvious difference is the elimination of the tyre to roller interface on a conventional roller dyno. The Dynapack eliminates this variable by using a hub adapter that provides direct coupling to our Power Absorption Units. There can be no tyre slip, no rolling resistance, and no chance of the vehicle coming off of the rollers at high speeds. Notice that we call this a variable. Sometimes it may be a problem area, other times it may not. Tyire temperature, tyre pressure, tyre traction, etc. are all variables that can change not only from run to run, but during the run as well. Throw an unknown variable like this into the equation and your data has now become subject to a potentially high margin of error. It is obviously better if this can be eliminated - which is what we have done. What you end up with on a roller is a giant, heavy flywheel attached to your engine. The inertia is such that just trying to accelerate the mass of the roller is a substantial load for the engine. How do you think that your measurements will be affected by being subjected to this large heavy flywheel phenomenon? Will small fluctuations in power delivery be easily noticeable? In a word, no. The flywheel effect tends to take small rapid fluctuations and smooth them right out. This is great if you want your power curve to look like a smooth pretty line, but it doesn't give you much insight into what is really occurring. What if you eliminated the flywheel effect? Whilst every spinning mass has some inertia, when compared to the total mass of the wheels, tires, rollers, and other associated hardware in a roller dyno, the inertia in the Dynapack is practically zero. This allows us to precisely measure and display tiny rapid pulses and oddities that you may not have ever seen before. Another benefit of having virtually zero inertia is the ability to change the rate of acceleration at will. In many simulations, you may want to make the vehicle accelerate at a different rate to simulate a specific condition. With a few simple keystrokes, we can allow the vehicle to accelerate very quickly, very slowly, or anywhere you'd like in between. Because of the lack of inertia and the total control we have over the axle speed, we give you choices. And as you know, choices are good! This makes Dynapack an outstanding choice in chassis dynamometers whilst establishing new industry standards.

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dynapack is more superior than any rolling road hence the reason many tuners have them and done away with there dyno rooms
That all depends on the tuner/operator :wink:

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Thought u were leaving the passat standard lol I knew it wouldn't last the big passats go well with a map in them I loved mine abit less bhp than yours 179.8 same sort of torque quick big car

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Gav I take you are know agreeing that the dynapack is better than a rolling road and that a rolling road does smooth the output curve??
I never agree on anything just annoy and row for fun :lol:

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A climb down if ever I saw one...... :lol:
Climb dow from what?? Your graph still looks pants compared to any othe TDI torque curves i've seen on hub dynos and FYI AI have tried their dyno, OBD's, and TT's all with 1.6bhp and 2-3lb/ft difference...

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The first and most obvious difference is the elimination of the tyre to roller interface on a conventional roller dyno. The Dynapack eliminates this variable by using a hub adapter that provides direct coupling to our Power Absorption Units. There can be no tyre slip, no rolling resistance, and no chance of the vehicle coming off of the rollers at high speeds. Notice that we call this a variable. Sometimes it may be a problem area, other times it may not. Tyire temperature, tyre pressure, tyre traction, etc. are all variables that can change not only from run to run, but during the run as well. Throw an unknown variable like this into the equation and your data has now become subject to a potentially high margin of error. It is obviously better if this can be eliminated - which is what we have done. What you end up with on a roller is a giant, heavy flywheel attached to your engine. The inertia is such that just trying to accelerate the mass of the roller is a substantial load for the engine. How do you think that your measurements will be affected by being subjected to this large heavy flywheel phenomenon? Will small fluctuations in power delivery be easily noticeable? In a word, no. The flywheel effect tends to take small rapid fluctuations and smooth them right out. This is great if you want your power curve to look like a smooth pretty line, but it doesn't give you much insight into what is really occurring. What if you eliminated the flywheel effect? Whilst every spinning mass has some inertia, when compared to the total mass of the wheels, tires, rollers, and other associated hardware in a roller dyno, the inertia in the Dynapack is practically zero. This allows us to precisely measure and display tiny rapid pulses and oddities that you may not have ever seen before. Another benefit of having virtually zero inertia is the ability to change the rate of acceleration at will. In many simulations, you may want to make the vehicle accelerate at a different rate to simulate a specific condition. With a few simple keystrokes, we can allow the vehicle to accelerate very quickly, very slowly, or anywhere you'd like in between. Because of the lack of inertia and the total control we have over the axle speed, we give you choices. And as you know, choices are good! This makes Dynapack an outstanding choice in chassis dynamometers whilst establishing new industry standards.
If you copy and paste please always state the source....

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How....apart from the obvious??
Phone them and find out for yourself...Telephone: 02894 478668 BTW it was the blue DC5 they used for the test.
If you copy and paste please always state the source....
Why, will I loose marks :wink:

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